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Jennifer Kay

Ask me anything   Miami-based AP reporter, among other things.

byjenniferkay.com

twitter.com/jnkay:

    BREAKING NEWS: AP video journalist, translator killed in Gaza →

    An Associated Press video journalist has been killed in an ordnance explosion in the Gaza Strip, together with a Palestinian translator and three members of the Gaza police.

    Simone Camilli, 35, died Wednesday when Gaza police engineers were neutralizing unexploded ordnance in the Gaza town of Beit Lahiya left over from fighting between Israel and Islamic militants.

    Camilli and a translator working with the AP, Ali Shehda Abu Afash, were accompanying the ordnance team on assignment when the explosion occurred. The police said four other people were seriously injured, including AP photographer Hatem Moussa.

    Camilli, an Italian national, had worked for The Associated Press since 2005.

    Camilli is the first foreign journalist killed in the Gaza conflict, which took more than 1,900 Palestinian lives and 67 on the Israeli side.

    (Source: yahoonews, via onaissues)

    — 1 week ago with 152 notes
    #news  #gaza  #israel  #journalism  #the associated press  #AP 
    futurejournalismproject:

The Robots are Coming, Part 132
First, some background, via Kevin Roose at New York Magazine:

Earlier this week, one of my business-beat colleagues got assigned to recap the quarterly earnings of Alcoa, the giant metals company, for the Associated Press. The reporter’s story began: “Alcoa Inc. (AA) on Tuesday reported a second-quarter profit of $138 million, reversing a year-ago loss, and the results beat analysts’ expectation. The company reported strong results in its engineered-products business, which makes parts for industrial customers, while looking to cut costs in its aluminum-smelting segment.”
It may not have been the most artful start to a story, but it got the point across, with just enough background information for a casual reader to make sense of it. Not bad. The most impressive part, though, was how long the story took to produce: less than a second.

If you’re into robots and algorithms writing the news, the article’s worth the read. It’s optimistic, asserting that in contexts like earnings reports, sports roundups and the like, the automation frees journalists for more mindful work such as analyzing what those earning reports actually mean
With 300 million robot-driven stories produced last year – more than all media outlets in the world combined, according to Roose – and an estimated billion stories in store for 2014, that’s a lot of freed up time to cast our minds elsewhere.
Besides, as Roose explains, “The stories that today’s robots can write are, frankly, the kinds of stories that humans hate writing anyway.”
More interesting, and more troubling, are the ethics behind algorithmically driven articles. Slate’s Nicholas Diakopoulos tried to tackle this question in April when he asked how we can incorporate robots into our news gathering with a level of expected transparency needed in today’s media environment. Part of his solution is understanding what he calls the “tuning criteria,” or the inherent biases, that are used to make editorial decisions when algorithms direct the news.
Here’s something else to chew on. Back to Roose:

Robot-generated stories aren’t all fill-in-the-blank jobs; the more advanced algorithms use things like perspective, tone, and humor to tailor a story to its audience. A robot recapping a basketball game, for example, might be able to produce two versions of a story using the same data: one upbeat story that reads as if a fan of the winning team had written it; and another glum version written from the loser’s perspective.

Apply this concept to a holy grail of startups and legacy organizations alike: customizing and personalizing the news just for you. Will future robots feed us a feel-good, meat and potatoes partisan diet of news based on the same sort behavioral tracking the ad industry uses to deliver advertising. With the time and cost of producing multiple stories from the same data sets approaching zero, it’s not difficult to imagine a news site deciding that they’ll serve different versions of the same story based on perceived political affiliations.
That’s a conundrum. One more worth exploring than whether an algorithm can give us a few paragraphs on who’s nominated for the next awards show.
Want more robots? Visit our Robots Tag.
Image: Twitter post, via @hanelly.

    futurejournalismproject:

    The Robots are Coming, Part 132

    First, some background, via Kevin Roose at New York Magazine:

    Earlier this week, one of my business-beat colleagues got assigned to recap the quarterly earnings of Alcoa, the giant metals company, for the Associated Press. The reporter’s story began: “Alcoa Inc. (AA) on Tuesday reported a second-quarter profit of $138 million, reversing a year-ago loss, and the results beat analysts’ expectation. The company reported strong results in its engineered-products business, which makes parts for industrial customers, while looking to cut costs in its aluminum-smelting segment.”

    It may not have been the most artful start to a story, but it got the point across, with just enough background information for a casual reader to make sense of it. Not bad. The most impressive part, though, was how long the story took to produce: less than a second.

    If you’re into robots and algorithms writing the news, the article’s worth the read. It’s optimistic, asserting that in contexts like earnings reports, sports roundups and the like, the automation frees journalists for more mindful work such as analyzing what those earning reports actually mean

    With 300 million robot-driven stories produced last year – more than all media outlets in the world combined, according to Roose – and an estimated billion stories in store for 2014, that’s a lot of freed up time to cast our minds elsewhere.

    Besides, as Roose explains, “The stories that today’s robots can write are, frankly, the kinds of stories that humans hate writing anyway.”

    More interesting, and more troubling, are the ethics behind algorithmically driven articles. Slate’s Nicholas Diakopoulos tried to tackle this question in April when he asked how we can incorporate robots into our news gathering with a level of expected transparency needed in today’s media environment. Part of his solution is understanding what he calls the “tuning criteria,” or the inherent biases, that are used to make editorial decisions when algorithms direct the news.

    Here’s something else to chew on. Back to Roose:

    Robot-generated stories aren’t all fill-in-the-blank jobs; the more advanced algorithms use things like perspective, tone, and humor to tailor a story to its audience. A robot recapping a basketball game, for example, might be able to produce two versions of a story using the same data: one upbeat story that reads as if a fan of the winning team had written it; and another glum version written from the loser’s perspective.

    Apply this concept to a holy grail of startups and legacy organizations alike: customizing and personalizing the news just for you. Will future robots feed us a feel-good, meat and potatoes partisan diet of news based on the same sort behavioral tracking the ad industry uses to deliver advertising. With the time and cost of producing multiple stories from the same data sets approaching zero, it’s not difficult to imagine a news site deciding that they’ll serve different versions of the same story based on perceived political affiliations.

    That’s a conundrum. One more worth exploring than whether an algorithm can give us a few paragraphs on who’s nominated for the next awards show.

    Want more robots? Visit our Robots Tag.

    Image: Twitter post, via @hanelly.

    — 2 weeks ago with 60 notes
    #news  #technology  #robots  #journalism 

    Newspaper nerdery. I thought it was interesting that they noted that Times New Roman originally was designed for readers, but they didn’t make the same distinction for Times Modern or Times Classic. 

    blankonblank:

    "It looks like it’s an accountant in a suit."

    This short doc explores the conflicted legacy of font Times New Roman.

    — 2 months ago with 3 notes
    #journalism  #newspaper  #news  #typography  #times new roman  #reading  #london 
    futurejournalismproject:

breakingnews:

AP photographer killed, reporter wounded in Afghanistan
AP: Veteran Associated Press photographer Anja Niedringhaus was killed and AP reporter Kathy Gannon was wounded on Friday when an Afghan policeman opened fire while they were sitting in their car in eastern Afghanistan.
Follow more on this story at Breaking News
Photo: Associated Press photographer Anja Niedringhaus poses for a photograph in Rome. (AP File Photo)

FJP — Via the BBC:

The attack took place in the town of Khost near the border with Pakistan…
…[The two journalists] had been travelling with election workers delivering ballots in the Tanay district of Khost province.
An eyewitness said a police unit commander had opened fire on the journalists as they were waiting for their convoy to move inside a security compound.
The police officer behind the attack was taken into custody after surrendering to other police…
…The BBC’s Afghanistan correspondent, David Loyn, says the election is being protected by the biggest military operation since the fall of the Taliban.
Nearly 200,000 troops have been deployed across the country to prevent attacks.
Rings of security have been set up around each polling centre, with the police at the centre and hundreds of troops on the outside.
Reporting restrictions are in place, limiting what can be broadcast about the candidates.

For what it’s worth, Niedringhaus was a former Nieman Fellow. Some of her work can be seen on her Tumblr. See also her 2007 essay in Nieman Reports on the emotions of photography, and this 2013 photo essay of her work in Afghanistan from the Atlantic.

    futurejournalismproject:

    breakingnews:

    AP photographer killed, reporter wounded in Afghanistan

    AP: Veteran Associated Press photographer Anja Niedringhaus was killed and AP reporter Kathy Gannon was wounded on Friday when an Afghan policeman opened fire while they were sitting in their car in eastern Afghanistan.

    Follow more on this story at Breaking News

    Photo: Associated Press photographer Anja Niedringhaus poses for a photograph in Rome. (AP File Photo)

    FJP — Via the BBC:

    The attack took place in the town of Khost near the border with Pakistan…

    …[The two journalists] had been travelling with election workers delivering ballots in the Tanay district of Khost province.

    An eyewitness said a police unit commander had opened fire on the journalists as they were waiting for their convoy to move inside a security compound.

    The police officer behind the attack was taken into custody after surrendering to other police…

    The BBC’s Afghanistan correspondent, David Loyn, says the election is being protected by the biggest military operation since the fall of the Taliban.

    Nearly 200,000 troops have been deployed across the country to prevent attacks.

    Rings of security have been set up around each polling centre, with the police at the centre and hundreds of troops on the outside.

    Reporting restrictions are in place, limiting what can be broadcast about the candidates.

    For what it’s worth, Niedringhaus was a former Nieman Fellow. Some of her work can be seen on her Tumblr. See also her 2007 essay in Nieman Reports on the emotions of photography, and this 2013 photo essay of her work in Afghanistan from the Atlantic.

    (via reportagebygettyimages)

    — 4 months ago with 458 notes
    #news  #journalism  #photojournalism  #afghanistan 
    "The Obama administration has a way to go to fulfill its promises from Day 1 to become the most transparent administration in history. More often than ever, the administration censored government files or outright denied access to them last year under the U.S. Freedom of Information Act, cited more legal exceptions it said justified withholding materials and refused a record number of times to turn over files quickly that might be especially newsworthy, according to a new analysis of federal data by The Associated Press."
    — 5 months ago with 7 notes
    #journalism  #news  #public records  #foia  #transparency  #government  #politics  #obama 

    Pete Seeger sings “Newspapermen Meet Such Interesting People.”

    For the whole song, which was written by a working reporter, listen here.

    — 6 months ago with 1 note
    #news  #pete seeger  #union  #protest  #publishing  #journalism  #folk music  #politics  #fairapcontact 
    "If only I had checked myself."

    guy who wrecked himself

    Sums up pretty much every story I’ve filed to the wire today. (I’ve also lost count of the New Year’s holidays that I’ve spent working. It’s like 10 or 11, I think.)

    (Source: benfoldsone, via thatkindofwoman)

    — 7 months ago with 201696 notes
    #journalism  #Party like a journalist  #new year's eve  #Happy New Year 
    "This fire leapt clear across two bays, hurdling at one point more than 3km of open water as if it was not even there. No one had ever seen that before."
futurejournalismproject:

Snow Fall, Meet Firestorm
If you haven’t checked it out yet—and I hope you have—The Guardian’s Firestorm, a Snow Fall-esque interactive long-form multimedia piece came out last month and it’s completely stunning.
From Poynter’s story on the teamwork required to put it together:

“I think you have to capture people’s hearts,” Francesca Panetta, special projects editor of interactive storytelling projects, said in a phone interview. “As with all kinds of storytelling, you can’t lose sight of that need to connect and touch people, whether it’s writing or radio or a complicated interactive.”
Firestorm is remarkable for a number of reasons, including the stellar video images and the subtle way that looping video is used behind the written story. The integration between words and video is handled with such finesse that the one doesn’t distract from the other.
“We’re very happy with the subtlety,” Panetta said.
The chapter navigation uses clear images and concise icons and labels, ensuring it’s always clear where you are in the story.
A project like Firestorm or The New York Times’ Pulitzer-winning interactive,Snow Fall, demands considerable resources. Twenty-three people are credited for Firestorm, which was three months in the making — actually a speedy turnaround for a project of this scale.
Many newsrooms don’t have that level of resources, of course. But they can still learn from The Guardian’s process and the project’s experiments with layered storytelling — and figure out ways to do something similar on a smaller scale.
Keep reading for key takeaways from the project.

FJP: I’ve been hearing people favor this one to Snow Fall but perhaps that’s because the story itself (which is incredibly moving) lends itself to a slightly more poignant interactive than Snow Fall…but both are fantastic. —Jihii
Bonus: E-book version of the story, which you can buy here, along with other Guardian shorts.

    "This fire leapt clear across two bays, hurdling at one point more than 3km of open water as if it was not even there. No one had ever seen that before."

    futurejournalismproject:

    Snow Fall, Meet Firestorm

    If you haven’t checked it out yet—and I hope you have—The Guardian’s Firestorm, a Snow Fall-esque interactive long-form multimedia piece came out last month and it’s completely stunning.

    From Poynter’s story on the teamwork required to put it together:

    “I think you have to capture people’s hearts,” Francesca Panetta, special projects editor of interactive storytelling projects, said in a phone interview. “As with all kinds of storytelling, you can’t lose sight of that need to connect and touch people, whether it’s writing or radio or a complicated interactive.”

    Firestorm is remarkable for a number of reasons, including the stellar video images and the subtle way that looping video is used behind the written story. The integration between words and video is handled with such finesse that the one doesn’t distract from the other.

    “We’re very happy with the subtlety,” Panetta said.

    The chapter navigation uses clear images and concise icons and labels, ensuring it’s always clear where you are in the story.

    A project like Firestorm or The New York Times’ Pulitzer-winning interactive,Snow Fall, demands considerable resources. Twenty-three people are credited for Firestorm, which was three months in the making — actually a speedy turnaround for a project of this scale.

    Many newsrooms don’t have that level of resources, of course. But they can still learn from The Guardian’s process and the project’s experiments with layered storytelling — and figure out ways to do something similar on a smaller scale.

    Keep reading for key takeaways from the project.

    FJP: I’ve been hearing people favor this one to Snow Fall but perhaps that’s because the story itself (which is incredibly moving) lends itself to a slightly more poignant interactive than Snow Fall…but both are fantastic. —Jihii

    Bonus: E-book version of the story, which you can buy here, along with other Guardian shorts.

    — 1 year ago with 98 notes
    #news  #journalism  #photojournalism  #multimedia  #australia  #tasmania  #fire  #climate change  #weather  #disaster 

    nbcnightlynews:

    First it was Snoop — now, Warren G. Brian Williams raps the ’90s classic “Regulate” — thanks to Jimmy Fallon.

    My day? Made.

    — 1 year ago with 189 notes
    #journalism  #news  #brian williams  #nbc 
    Front page news in The Villages, Florida: Butterfly research! … They just used a picture of the wrong swallowtail. The story link below has the right picture.

MIAMI (AP) — The fate of an endangered butterfly species in the Florida Keys may rest on the fragile wings of a single female Schaus swallowtail and a handful of caterpillars captured in Biscayne National Park, according to University of Florida researchers hoping they have a second chance to save it from extinction.
Read more: http://www.seattlepi.com/news/science/article/Scientists-hope-lab-program-saves-Fla-butterfly-4571742.php#ixzz2VFZbRWdi

    Front page news in The Villages, Florida: Butterfly research! … They just used a picture of the wrong swallowtail. The story link below has the right picture.

    MIAMI (AP) — The fate of an endangered butterfly species in the Florida Keys may rest on the fragile wings of a single female Schaus swallowtail and a handful of caterpillars captured in Biscayne National Park, according to University of Florida researchers hoping they have a second chance to save it from extinction.

    — 1 year ago
    #florida  #news  #journalism  #science  #environment  #butterfly  #wildlife  #bug  #insect  #green  #research  #university of florida  #endangered species 
    timelightbox:

Photograph by Steve Ruark—AP
“If something’s not photographed, it’s easy to deny,” photographer Steve Ruark says. “It’s a fact that Americans are getting killed overseas. Making people look at it makes them weigh the costs.”
Since April 2009, the Associated Press has sent a still photographer to every dignified transfer of servicemen and women killed in Iraq or Afghanistan open to the media. Most often it is freelancer Steve Ruark, who has now attended almost 500 transfers since 2009.
See the photos on LightBox here.

    timelightbox:

    Photograph by Steve Ruark—AP

    “If something’s not photographed, it’s easy to deny,” photographer Steve Ruark says. “It’s a fact that Americans are getting killed overseas. Making people look at it makes them weigh the costs.”

    Since April 2009, the Associated Press has sent a still photographer to every dignified transfer of servicemen and women killed in Iraq or Afghanistan open to the media. Most often it is freelancer Steve Ruark, who has now attended almost 500 transfers since 2009.

    See the photos on LightBox here.

    — 1 year ago with 102 notes
    #news  #journalism  #Photojournalism.  #associated press  #military  #funeral  #honor  #memorial  #memorial day  #photography 

    reportagebygettyimages:

    Full Video: “God’s Ivory”

    This is the full 14-minute version of “God’s Ivory,” a film by Reportage by Getty Images that examines the illegal ivory trade and the religious devotion that fuels it. Filmmaker Andrew Hida collaborated with photographer Brent Stirton and writer Bryan Christy to elaborate on the award-winning report the pair originally made for National Geographic in 2012. See more from this feature in the latest issue of Reportage’s online magazine.

    The video is also viewable on our YouTube account.

    Searing, important work here. Hard to watch, but harder to ignore.

    — 1 year ago with 111 notes
    #elephant  #ivory  #photography  #photographers on tumblr  #getty  #reportage  #news  #photojournalism  #journalism  #africa  #asia  #china  #philippines  #thailand  #religion 
    The National Hurricane Center’s efforts to improve how they communicate the danger of storm surge is front page news in Pensacola.

MIAMI (AP) — During a hurricane, storm surge is one of the greatest threats to life and land, yet many people don’t understand the dire warnings from forecasters to get out of its way. So this season, they hope to offer easy-to-understand, color-coded maps and change the way they talk to the public. (Read more …)

    The National Hurricane Center’s efforts to improve how they communicate the danger of storm surge is front page news in Pensacola.

    MIAMI (AP) — During a hurricane, storm surge is one of the greatest threats to life and land, yet many people don’t understand the dire warnings from forecasters to get out of its way. So this season, they hope to offer easy-to-understand, color-coded maps and change the way they talk to the public. (Read more …)

    — 1 year ago
    #florida  #florida panhandle  #miami  #pensacola  #hurricane  #tropical weather  #weather  #tropical storm  #tropic  #disaster  #news  #journalism  #newspaper  #caribbean 
    timelightbox:

Photograph by Muhammed Muheisen—AP
Wire photographer spotlight: Muhammed Muheisen’s photographs are poignant visual reminders of how humanity awakens and lives out each day in Pakistan, Syria and Afghanistan. Here, TIME presents a selection of the Associated Press photographer’s work from the past calendar year. 

    timelightbox:

    Photograph by Muhammed Muheisen—AP

    Wire photographer spotlight: Muhammed Muheisen’s photographs are poignant visual reminders of how humanity awakens and lives out each day in Pakistan, Syria and Afghanistan. Here, TIME presents a selection of the Associated Press photographer’s work from the past calendar year. 

    — 1 year ago with 143 notes
    #photography  #Photojournalism.  #News  #journalism  #Afghanistan  #pakistan  #syria  #humanity  #people  #reportage  #associated press