Bob Adelman to Lecture and Consult in Photography at Library | News Releases - Library of Congress

Here’s the line from this press release that has had me thinking since I saw this news on the Lens blog (emphasis mine):

Verna Curtis, curator of photography in the Prints and Photographs Division, said, “Adelman has immersed himself in key events of our time and known many of the great individuals who made them happen, from the inspirational Martin Luther King, Jr. and pop pioneers Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein to fiction writer Raymond Carver. At a time when photographic documentation was becoming personal, Adelman delved deeply into the documentary tradition as Lewis Hine and Dorothea Lange, two of his heroes, had before him. He found important issues—such as poverty, education, war and women’s rights—and became involved in changing and improving what he had witnessed. Adelman’s photographs were used in many venues: classrooms, court cases and fundraising campaigns.”

At a time when photography focused on the personal, Adelman looked outward. Is this recognition the tipping point for regarding photojournalism as fine art or as an equal to fine art photography? I hope so.

photojournalism photography library of congress news bob adelman civil rights


35 Magnum Photographers Give Their Advice to Aspiring Photographerserickimphotography.com

This shot list idea is so smart:

Bill Reeves, a passionate photographer who is fortunate enough to have Magnum photographers Eli Reed and Paolo Pellegrin as his mentors, told me about a blog post that Magnum had a while back regarding advice to young photographers. It was put together by Alec Soth, who has done a series of fascinating projects such as his most popular, “Sleeping by the Missisippi” which was done on a 8×10 view camera. An interesting excerpt that Bill put together about Alec is below:


Alec writes up lists of things to shoot. Some normal objects, like suitcases, and others more weird, like unusually tall people. He would tape this list to his steering wheel, and be reminded to shoot those things when he saw them. When he found someone to shoot, he would talk to them, and from that conversation find the next thing to go looking for. An example is he did a portrait of a guy who built model airplanes, and then a portrait of a hooker. The link? She had airplanes painted on her nails. He then went to photograph Charles Lindberg’s childhood home, which led him to photograph Johnny Cash’s boyhood home and so on and so forth.

35 Magnum Photographers Give Their Advice to Aspiring Photographers
erickimphotography.com

This shot list idea is so smart:

Bill Reeves, a passionate photographer who is fortunate enough to have Magnum photographers Eli Reed and Paolo Pellegrin as his mentors, told me about a blog post that Magnum had a while back regarding advice to young photographers. It was put together by Alec Soth, who has done a series of fascinating projects such as his most popular, “Sleeping by the Missisippi” which was done on a 8×10 view camera. An interesting excerpt that Bill put together about Alec is below:

Alec writes up lists of things to shoot. Some normal objects, like suitcases, and others more weird, like unusually tall people. He would tape this list to his steering wheel, and be reminded to shoot those things when he saw them. When he found someone to shoot, he would talk to them, and from that conversation find the next thing to go looking for. An example is he did a portrait of a guy who built model airplanes, and then a portrait of a hooker. The link? She had airplanes painted on her nails. He then went to photograph Charles Lindberg’s childhood home, which led him to photograph Johnny Cash’s boyhood home and so on and so forth.

(Source: zachwise)

photography photojournalism

reportagebygettyimages:

'Imagery is the unrivaled language of our time and Getty Images is deeply committed to supporting the vision and passions of emerging and established photographers and other artists. Our global grants programme has spanned a decade and is the largest in the industry, yet each year’s entrants never fail to produce work that both inspires and profoundly moves us.' - Getty Images CEO Jonathan Klein

Today, Getty Images announced the recipients of its 2014 Editorial Grants. Congratulations to the winners:

Krisanne Johnson - South Africa’s Post-Apartheid Youth

Juan Arredondo Born in Conflict

Jordi Busqué The Mennonites of Bolivia

William Daniels CAR in Chaos

Giulio Di Sturco Ganges: Death of a River

Laura Boushnak - I Read I Write - Laura was awarded the ‘Lean In’ grant, for a project which deals with the empowerment of women.

All of the recipients will now embark on the completion of their projects. Please read more about the winners and their work on Time Lightbox and New York Times Lens Blog.

photojournalism lean in photography

Miami, Florida on Flickr.

MIAMI (AP) — As they do whenever they visit Florida, Greg Groff and his young daughter stopped by the manatee pool at Miami Seaquarium, where the speed bump-shaped marine mammals placidly swim in circles.
They noted the pink scars and disfigured tail on one manatee, damage from a boat propeller that left it unable to survive in the wild.
Florida’s manatees need even more stringent protections than their listing on the federal endangered species list, Groff said, adding that boaters should go elsewhere if they don’t like speed limits in waters where manatees swim.
"There’s plenty of places they can go faster," the Chicago man said. "They can go out in the middle of the ocean if they want to go much, much, much quicker, and you won’t have to worry about them running the manatees over."
Groff’s comments are representative of the environmentalist and general public side of an ongoing fight with a group of boaters, businesses and conservatives over whether the manatee should retain its 1967 federal listing as an endangered species, the most protective classification.
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is reviewing whether the manatee should be reclassified as a “threatened” species, which would allow some flexibility for federal officials as the species recovers while maintaining most of the protections afforded to animals listed as endangered.
As part of the lengthy review process, the agency is seeking public comment on its finding that a petition to reclassify the manatee has merits. The deadline is Tuesday. A decision on whether a change is warranted won’t be made until the agency completes its review, which could take a year. … READ MORE.

Miami, Florida on Flickr.

MIAMI (AP) — As they do whenever they visit Florida, Greg Groff and his young daughter stopped by the manatee pool at Miami Seaquarium, where the speed bump-shaped marine mammals placidly swim in circles.

They noted the pink scars and disfigured tail on one manatee, damage from a boat propeller that left it unable to survive in the wild.

Florida’s manatees need even more stringent protections than their listing on the federal endangered species list, Groff said, adding that boaters should go elsewhere if they don’t like speed limits in waters where manatees swim.

"There’s plenty of places they can go faster," the Chicago man said. "They can go out in the middle of the ocean if they want to go much, much, much quicker, and you won’t have to worry about them running the manatees over."

Groff’s comments are representative of the environmentalist and general public side of an ongoing fight with a group of boaters, businesses and conservatives over whether the manatee should retain its 1967 federal listing as an endangered species, the most protective classification.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is reviewing whether the manatee should be reclassified as a “threatened” species, which would allow some flexibility for federal officials as the species recovers while maintaining most of the protections afforded to animals listed as endangered.

As part of the lengthy review process, the agency is seeking public comment on its finding that a petition to reclassify the manatee has merits. The deadline is Tuesday. A decision on whether a change is warranted won’t be made until the agency completes its review, which could take a year. … READ MORE.

manatee florida miami wildlife endangered species government